European Council

This edition of BISMUN brings a new type of committee that will tackle issues related to the European continent. The European Council represents the highest level of political cooperation between EU countries and it defines the general political direction and priorities of the European Union. It operates out of Brussels and it is consisted of the heads of state or government of EU countries, European Commission President, High Representative for Foreign Affairs & Security Policy. 

 

Topics 

1.Further development of renewable energy 

There is almost universal international consensus that global warming and climate change caused by carbon emissions constitute a real threat. The reduction of emissions are therefore a declared goal of the international community. The Paris Agreement was one of the biggest and most celebrated achievement on this path so far. Transforming the energy sector from fossil energy sources to renewable energy is one of many steps for European countries to reach their emission reduction targets under the agreement. This will require not only significant investment into infrastructure, but also the development and adoption of new technologies. European cooperation and initiatives on the level of the European Union can greatly accelerate the process and help with development, adoption and financing.

2.Preserving political stability and the uprise of EU skepticism 

Recent years have seen the rise of anti-EU parties and organisations in many member countries. In some of them, those parties are now part of the government. The United Kingdom even voted to leave the European Union entirely in a referendum held in 2016. At the same time, governments in some member countries are, in the view of the European institutions, dismantling the separation of powers or are in open defiance of EU legislation and agreements. While the major issue that is driving the division has been the question of migration, there are also the ongoing stability issue of the eurozone, the deficit regulations for national budgets, freedom of movement, different opinions about the future of European integration, high youth unemployment and many other issues that are driving the division. As the European Union is increasingly becoming a scapegoat and movements in many countries seek to follow the British example, the question how the EU best reacts to these developments remains unanswered.

 

Chairpersons 

Attila Nagy 

Adelina Budulan 

 

COUNTRIES       
Austria
Belgium
Bulgaria
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland
Italy
Latvia
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Malta
Netherlands
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
United Kingdom