The Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Affairs Committee

The General Assembly allocates to its Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Affairs Committee, commonly referred to as the “Third Committee”, its agenda items relating to a range of social, humanitarian affairs and human rights issues that affect people all over the world. An important part of the work of the Committee focuses on the examination of human rights questions, including reports of the special procedures of the Human Rights Council which was established in 2006. 

The Committee also discusses the advancement of women, the protection of children, indigenous issues, the treatment of refugees, the promotion of fundamental freedoms through the elimination of racism and racial discrimination, and the right to self-determination.  The Committee also addresses important social development questions such as issues related to youth, family, aging, people with disabilities, crime prevention, criminal justice and international drug control. 

 

Topics 

1. Towards the Elimination of Modern slavery: Strategies to Combat International Slavery

Modern-day slavery can take various forms including but not limited to human trafficking,
forced labour, debt bondage, forced or servile marriage, the sale and exploitation of children. The
prevalence of modern-day slavery could be explained by the immense size of the problem in
particular states, the inadequate government response, the vulnerability of the victims. The
challenge for all states, developed or developing, is to target the criminals who exploit desperate
people and protect and assist victims of trafficking and smuggled migrants, many of whom
endure unimaginable hardships in their bid for a better life. The topic puts special emphasis on
the multidimensional character of the problem and opts for an international response, taking into
account the protection of fundamental rights as well as the implementation on international
instruments such as the United Nations Convention on Transnational Organized Crime and its
protocols on trafficking in persons and migrant smuggling.

2. Displaced Populations due to Climate Change: Migrants or Refugees?

When referring to the consequences of climate change, usually extreme weather conditions and
natural disasters come in mind. Yet since 2008, more than 20 million people have fled their
homes as a result of climate change. These displaced populations cannot be classified as refugees
based on the 1951 Geneva Convention, yet the term "migrant" fails to depict the involuntary
character of their displacement. Therefore, a new legal framework as well as practical assistance
is of great importance for the protection of people displaced by climate change.

 

 Chairpersons 

Eleni D. Maletsika
Wassim Loudini

COUNTRIES   
India
South Africa
Bangladesh
Indonesia
Afghanisatn
Brazil
Philippines
Mali
Mexico
Burkina Faso
Chad
Ukraine
North Macedonia
Nicaragua
Australia
Turkey
Pakistan
Georgia
Canada
Iraq
Niger
United States of America
Russian Federation
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
France
Germany
China
Italy
Spain
Norway
Sweden
Austria
Nigeria
United Arab Emirates
Saudi Arabia
Israel
Japan
Denmark
Belgium
Jordan