The Committee on Disarmament and International Security

The Committee on Disarmament and International Security (1st Committee of the General Assembly of the United Nations) is the Committee responsible for the maintenance of international peace and security. The mandate of one of the main committees of the General Assembly is devoted to disarmament and any threat to peace that may affect the international community as we know it. The endeavors of the 1st Committee of the GA are also focused on seeking solutions to any possible and future challenges that the regime of international security may face. 

DISEC includes all the member states of the UN in its corps, following the principle of ‘’one member, one vote’’, providing the opportunity to member states to focus, among others, on issues of arms control and global safety. Although the 1st Committee of the GA does not possess the exclusive and binding mandate of the Security Council, it is constantly in full cooperation with this main body of the UN, by making recommendations that concern the field of international peace and security. The normative nature of the resolutions of this committee renders them salient, let alone respected by the Security Council. 

 

Topics 

Topic Area A: Space Weaponization: Challenges of Preserving the Outer Space a
Peaceful Place

The International Community has been interested on keeping the outer space a place
free from weapons of mass destruction, shared by all nations since the 1950s. Despite
the existence of the "Outer Space Treaty", that sets the basic principles related to the
exploration of outer space and the prohibition of placement of weapons of mass
destruction on celestial bodies, the late technological and scientific developments, that
many countries have access to, bring the need for a new framework against the
weaponization of outer space to the forefront. The challenges for the delegates
attending the DISEC sessions, while adressing the topic, would be to agree on the
need for a stricter legal framework related to the prohibition of arms on outer space
and the prospect of a broad collaboration on space exploration amongst states to the
benefit of all nations.

Topic Area B: The role of Private Military Contractors in sustaining and creating
conflicts
Regardless the fact that there is a plethora of national and international laws that
regulate the operation of private armies, existing legislation is deemed as not
sufficient. International treaties and initiatives fail to regulate the use of private armies
under the prism of dealing with issues related to their use. The International
Convention on the use of Mercenaries, ratified under the Geneva Convention and the
UN Convention against the Recruitment, Use, Financing and Training of Mercenaries
(1989) does not appropriately address the issue, mainly because its definition of
“mercenary” is unworkable. Moreover, national efforts trying to regulate the use of
Private Military Contractors are to a great extent insufficient on account of
definitional disparities between States. They additionally face various difficulties
because of the globalized nature of the industry. Private security firms are created,
dissolved, merged and moved from one place to another in order to make them more
difficult to regulate.

 

Chairpersons 

Panagiotis Moumtsakis

Alexandros Avramis

COUNTRIES 
Afghanistan
Australia
Bolivia
Brazil
China
Chile
Congo
Cote D'Ivoire
Egypt
Ethiopia
France
Germany
India
Iran
Iraq
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Jordan
Kazakhstan
DPRK
Korea, Republic of
Kuwait
Lebanon
Libya
The Netherlands
Nigeria
Pakistan
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Russian Federation
Saudi Arabia
Serbia
South Africa
Sweden
Syria
Ukraine
United Kingdom
United States of America
Venzuela